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Study to be a teachers aid or a primary teacher?

Answered 2 years ago

Mums, please help me.
I am currently studying online to become a primary teacher (second year out of 4), but not feeling very motivated. I feel exhausted all the time, uni assignments are quite complicated, and I just down enjoy it anymore.
My twins started school full time this year and I have been volunteering a lot at their school... and starting to realise that teachers are completely overworked, stressed and underpaid. So I am not that sure that all the effort that I am putting at uni is worth it, I mean, I want a job to keep me occupied, but I don't want to be stressed, working on weekends, etc. So I was thinking a teaching assistant job would be a better idea for me? Anyone could help me with some input?
Money is not an issue (husband is earning pretty good $ and I have my own assets, in case marriage goes wrong).
Ah, important info: I live in a very remote area, so there seems to be a very high demand for both school teachers and teachers aides.
Thanks :-)


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ANSWER
2 years ago
Is it possible you are in the wrong field altogether? Wanting a job to keep you occupied probably isn't enough to make you a good teacher - its a tough job and you are going to need a real passion for education. I don't mean to be harsh but I think if you had the desire for teaching you would know. So the other option may be a better work-life balance for you.

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REPLY
2 years ago
I love this ^

REPLY
2 years ago
I wouldn’t say I am particularly passionate about education... and I would probably work as a relief teacher.

REPLY
2 years ago
Thanks for your reply though! Definitely food for thought...

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2 years ago
Even of the most passionate of teacher will find relief work a nightmare. I can't stand people that come in half assed about it and leave a shit fight for me to come back the next day. If you haven't fulfilled much time as a proper class teacher, I doubt you'd understand what needs to be done or have the skills to handle various kids etc. with limited experience and that attitude. If you are half assed about teaching and have a walk in walk out attitude, you probably won't be a good supply teacher or get call backs either. I'd say stay right out of education, you are the ones that make more work for us all, even as a teacher assistant. If your heart isn't in it, you aren't thinking ahead and you don't have the initiative care and motivation to do what we need you to do without having to spell everything out and make more work for us and be a drain.

ANSWER
2 years ago
I think it's still worth getting the degree. You could always do relief teaching work or part time if you don't really need the money. I am a qualified primary teacher but only work casual hours doing relief work and think it's great - teaching but without a lot of the admin and marking and long hours of after school prep. There are some downsides to it - don't know the kids so behaviour management can be trickier as you don't have an existing relationship with them, plus don't get to choose what they do, teacher usually has specific plans & you have to run those activities. But yeah, I love it.

I think SSO work would also be quite rewarding but depends how you feel about working with the really high needs kids. I.e. on the spectrum or other disabilities, acting out because of trauma at home, kids who are being abused & are violent & angry etc. I've never done it so can't tell you what it's like, but from what I've observed that is usually what they are there to help with.

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REPLY
2 years ago
Do you mind me asking you a question? Can you just be a relief teacher? I mean... do you ever have to work full time to keep your teacher’s registration? Or can I graduate and just become a relief teacher? Thanks!

REPLY
2 years ago
In SA you need to do one year full time equivalent in order to go from provisional to full license, but you can do it over three years. Depends on the state so might be different for you - check out the teachers registration board website in your state.

ANSWER
2 years ago
Teacher assistant could be good, very good hours if you have children in school and wanting to have school holidays off. If not maybe look into nursing, can be family friendly hours as well.
I quit my path to my teaching degree and went into homeschooling my children. I know do that full time and work online part time to make a little money. Best of luck xo

ANSWER
2 years ago
My response was cut off. I imagine that if you have young children you’re quite young, as in your 20s or 30s. My point is that if that’s the case you may have 30 or so years of work ahead of you and finishing your degree gives you many more options. You’re already half way through, why not keep going? If you’re finding it too tiring you could cut back to part time study?

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REPLY
2 years ago
I just turned 38... I am already studying part time, I might even drop to one subject only, til my youngest starts school. I am a bit tired of feeling guilty - guilty that I am doing any of my “jobs” (Mum, housekeeper, student) properly.
Thanks for your reply :-)

ANSWER
2 years ago
Do you mind if I ask how old you are? I imagine that if you have small children you’re quite young

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REPLY
2 years ago
I am 38! :-)