9 Of Australia’s Most Mysterious Missing Children’s CasesWhere did these children vanish to?

There is no nightmare for parents quite like the one of their children disappearing, never to be seen again.

But for some Australian families, this nightmare has become their daily reality.

Children don’t go missing every day in Australia, but it still does happen. Sometimes they’re found, sometimes they’re not. Sometimes, despite suspicions held by both family and police, nobody’s really sure what happened to them.

What follows are some of Australia’s missing children mysteries. You might be familiar with some, while others will be new. They are just a sampling of the many sad stories that haunt the families of these children to this day.

These are 9 of Australia’s most mysterious missing children’s cases.

1. Quanne Diec, Aged 12

Australia’s Most Mysterious Missing Children’s Cases
via www.9news.com.au

Quanne Diec was last seen by her dad at 7am on the 27th of July 1998. She was 12 years old and had just left her home in Granville, NSW to go to school. In order to get there, she needed to catch a train from Slyde to Strathfield. She never arrived. Unfortunately, her disappearance wasn’t reported until 10 hours after she went missing as the school assumed she was sick, and her parents assumed she was at school.

One month after she vanished, the Government of New South Wales posted a $100,000 reward for anyone who could provide information that would lead to the discovery of Quanne. A year later, that was increased to $200,000. There has been no sign of her since.

2. Bradford Pholi, Aged 10

Australia’s Most Mysterious Missing Children’s Cases
via www.news.com.au

Ten-year-old Bradford Pholi left his family home in Dundas, NSW intending to get on a train to Newtown to see his aunt. It was Boxing Day of 1982. For reasons unknown, Bradford never arrived at his aunt’s house. In fact, police believe he never arrived at the train station. Initially, they believed that he had joined a gang of runaway children, as there were some unconfirmed sightings over the New Year period. However, at later inquests, there were a number of suspects, including his own mother (who died four years after he went missing) and the unknown man who was with Bradford’s mother when she reported him missing.

Bradford’s older siblings still hold out hope that someone will be able to shed light on what happened to their little brother. A $100,000 reward was offered in 2009.

3. William Tyrell, Aged 3

Australia’s Most Mysterious Missing Children’s Cases
via www.dailytelegraph.com.au

One of the better known missing children’s cases in recent years, William Tyrell disappeared without a trace from his grandparent’s front yard in Kendall, NSW on the 12th of September 2014. Aged just three, he was playing with his sister and only out of sight for five minutes before his family realised he was missing. However, despite extensive searching, no trace of him has been found.

Police are currently pursuing several lines of inquiry, and a number of suspects have been questioned, including those with links to paedophile groups.

4. Helen Karipidis, Aged 10

 

Australia’s Most Mysterious Missing Children’s Cases
via www.dailytelegraph.com.au

There’s a lot of mystery surrounding the disappearance of 10-year-old Helen Karipidis. She went missing on the 22nd of December 1988 while playing with a group of friends. Her disappearance went unnoticed by those around her until the evening. When investigating the case, police uncovered what they believed was evidence that young Helen had been abused by a member of her family, and possibly raped by a neighbour.

Maria, Helen’s older sister, who committed suicide two years after Helen went missing, indicated that Helen may have been planning to run away. However, her family told police that the girl seemed in good spirits and looking forward to Christmas.

5. Craig Ewen Taylor, Aged 9

Australia’s Most Mysterious Missing Children’s Cases
via www.news.com.au

Craig Ewen Taylor was nine years old when he disappeared from a shack during a family holiday on September 3, 1993. Craig had been adopted by his aunt and uncle and, before his disappearance, had travelled with them to Coningham in Tasmania for a holiday. However, on the 3rd of September, he mysteriously disappeared, and no trace has been found.

The case was passed on to the coroner who ultimately ruled his (assumed) death a mystery. There is some indication that he borrowed a kayak and drowned in the water, but other witness statements suggest he was abducted. It seems that nobody knows.

6. Eloise Worledge, Aged 8

Australia’s Most Mysterious Missing Children’s Cases
via en.mogaznews.com

The case of Eloise Worledge really is a parent’s worst nightmare. Last seen on the night of January 12, 1976 in Beaumaris, VIC, it appears that Eloise was abducted. Her brother raised the alarm in the early hours of January 13th, and later told police he’d heard robbers kidnap her but had been too scared to speak up.

The police enquiry ultimately ruled that Eloise had been lured from her bed by someone she knew, and walked out the front door. Despite the biggest missing person’s search in Victorian history to that point, no sign of her was ever found.

7. Patrick “Paddy” Hildebrand, Aged 9

Australia’s Most Mysterious Missing Children’s Cases
via www.australianmissingpersonsregister.com

There’s a place in the Victorian bush called Lilly Pilly Gully. It sounds like something from a fairytale, but it’s also the place where nine-year-old Patrick Hildebrand disappeared. It was the end of June in 1987, and Paddy was walking ahead of his family on a bush walking track. Considered mildly autistic (although not officially diagnosed), Paddy loved to bushwalk. He ran ahead of his family, and was never seen again.

His disappearance prompted an enormous search of the area that saw those involved come back over the years and search some more, unbelieving that Paddy could have gone unnoticed with so many people looking for him. A mystery, and a tragedy.

8. Joanne Ratcliff, Aged 11 & Kirstie Gordon, Aged 4

Australia’s Most Mysterious Missing Children’s Cases
via www.news.com.au

Most Australians have heard the names Joanne Ratcliff and Kirstie Gordon before. After all, it’s a case as sad as it is mysterious. The girls both went missing on the 25th of August 1973 from the Adelaide Oval. Both their families had been there to watch a SANFL game, and Kirstie’s grandmother asked if Joanne would take Kirstie to the toilet. They never came back. After 15 minutes, their parents realised something was wrong, and went off looking for the girls, but they were not found.

The Assistant Curator of the Oval believed that he saw the girls leaving the oval with a man, and over the 90 minutes that followed the alarm being raised, they were seen by 4 witnesses with the same man. In three sighting, Joanne appeared distressed. The last sighting was 3 kilometres from the oval. They were never seen again.

9. The Beaumont Children, Aged 9,7 & 4

Australia’s Most Mysterious Missing Children’s Cases | Stay At Home Mum
via www.abc.net.au

Easily one of the most well known missing child cases in Australia, the case of the Beaumont children is widely recognised as having changed the way Australians viewed child safety. It all went down on Australia Day 1966 when the three Beaumont Children, Jane, Arnna and Grant, caught the bus to Glenelg Beach near Adelaide, SA. They were supposed to return at 2pm, and by 7:30pm their parents knew something was wrong and called police.

Witness accounts later uncovered that the children had been seen with a tall blonde man at the beach. Later, they were seen in a shop purchasing food with money their parents did not give them. Police later suggested that they believed the case to be linked to the later disappearance of Joanne Ratcliff and Kirstie Gordon, but as of today no trace of the Beaumont siblings has been found.

To support continued forensic digging in search of the children, you can sign a petition here.

Did you know about these missing children? What do you think happened to them?

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