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27 Slang Terms for Sexual Intercourse Throughout History

5 min read
27 Slang Terms for Sexual Intercourse Throughout History

Sexual intercourse. Such a clinical, boring, uninspiring term.

It really takes me smack back to the sex ed classes in school. I’m sure those classes were provided to educate but honestly, I think they were more intended to scare the bejeezus out of us and lead us to abstain from any kind of sexual activity for the rest of our lives! My mind still shudders with memories of those graphic images that apparently were necessary to share. Yeeucch!!

Now in my circle of friends and acquaintances if I said say “I am good to go and ready for some sexual intercourse tonight with my man!” I would be shut down and probably give them ample years of taking the piss on my behalf. Not something I’m willing to hand them on a plate oh no sir-ee!.

27 Slang Terms for Sexual Intercourse Throughout History | Stay At Home Mum

Now if I were to substitute ‘sexual intercourse’ with a “roll in the hay”, “to go bump uglies”, or “getting some horizontal tango action”, not one single eyebrow would be raised.

Slang terms for sex have been used right throughout history. It seems that it’s been acceptable and really, kind of expected to get a little creative when describing the act of having sex.

Let’s take a look through some of the more comical terms that our forefathers (and mothers) came up with.

Thanks to Green’s Dictionary of Slang which covers hundreds of years of common talk, vulgarity and jargon, I now present to you……

A timeline of slang terms for the act of sexual intercourse!!!

  1. Give someone a green gown (1351). Now, after the initial what the hell??, I now am putting my interpretive cap on and making the presumption this was a reference to having a roll in the hay, but the hay was green and probably grass and now you look like a walking taking turn farm.
  1. Play nug-a-nug (1505)

27 Slang Terms for Sexual Intercourse Throughout History | Stay At Home Mum

  1. Play the pyredewy (1512)
  1. Play at Couch quail (1521)
  1. Ride below the crupper (1578). Not sure what to make of this one. A crupper is a strap that is bucked to a saddled and looped under the horses tail to prevent the saddle moving forward. I’m leaving this one right here!
  1. Board a land carrack (1604). With a Carrack being a large merchant ship, I don’t know HOW I’d feel being compared to be bloody huge ship!
  1. Fadoodling (1611). Well isn’t this just fabulously delightful? James VI was the King of England, and fashion was questionable to say the least. It goes to follow the language would be just as gushy. Could you imagine the conversation? “We ride our steeds in the dawning of the day to battle you are requested that none of you partake in any form of fadoodling to retain your energy!” See, it fits a little wanky but fits.
27 Slang Terms for Sexual Intercourse Throughout History | Stay At Home Mum
via urbandictionary.com

 

About Author

Michelle Gadd

Being a single parent since her children were toddlers, Michelle has enjoyed life's challenges, and is able to relate to other mothers and fathers of...Read Morechildren growing up and developing through life's stages. The laughter, heartbreak, tantrums and victories are all memories to be shared and embraced. With sheer determination or as some may prefer to call it stubbornness and with a sometimes twisted view - Michelle will always find the humorous side of life. Michelle has a business background working in Government departments for over 20 years holding multiple Business Diploma's and other certifications including Training and Assessing, Project Management and Volunteer Coordination amongst them. With an attitude of "˜life being an adventure - start living', she is always looking for new challenges and the chance to share knowledge and experiences with the Stay At Home Mum Community. Mother of two teens who also makes claim to even have her sanity intact (on most days) Michelle has ventured into writing sharing her sometime sassy and wry sense of humour. Read Less

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